9 days in East Asia Itinerary

9 days in East Asia Itinerary

Created using Inspirock Japan travel planner

Make it your trip
Fly
1
Hiroshima
— 1 night
Train
2
Kyoto
— 3 nights
Drive
3
Nara
— 1 night
Train
4
Nagoya
— 1 night
Drive
5
Ise
— 2 nights
Fly

S M T W T F S
29
30
31
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11

Hiroshima

— 1 night

City of Peace

Grapple with history and appreciate modernity in Hiroshima, a city known around the world for its tragic past and inspiring rebirth.
On the 3rd (Fri), admire the natural beauty at Shukkei-en Garden, contemplate the long history of Atomic Bomb Dome, then see the interesting displays at Hiroshima Peace Memorial Museum, and finally make a trip to Peace Memorial Park - Hiroshima. Get ready for a full day of sightseeing on the 4th (Sat): explore the world behind art at Hiroshima Museum of Art, then look for gifts at Itsukushima Gekijyo, then take in the spiritual surroundings of Itsukushima Shrine, and finally head outdoors with Outdoor Activities.

For photos, where to stay, ratings, and other tourist information, you can read our Hiroshima route maker site.

Hakodate to Hiroshima is an approximately 5-hour flight. You can also do a combination of ferry and car; or do a combination of ferry and train. Traveling from Hakodate in September, expect Hiroshima to be somewhat warmer, temps between 32°C and 24°C. Wrap up your sightseeing on the 4th (Sat) to allow time to take a train to Kyoto.

Things to do in Hiroshima

Historic Sites · Museums · Shopping · Parks

Side Trip

Find places to stay Sep 3 — 4:

Kyoto

— 3 nights
The national capital for over a thousand years, Kyoto retains much of the charm of old Japan, boasting numerous temples and shrines that seem completely untouched by the modern world.
Kids will enjoy Kiyomizu-dera Temple and Gion. Next up on the itinerary: contemplate in the serene atmosphere at Fushimi Inari-taisha Shrine, relax and rejuvenate at some of the best spas, stop by Musubi Kyoto, and explore the historical opulence of Nijo Castle.

For photos, more things to do, where to stay, and more tourist information, read our Kyoto online trip planner.

Take a train from Hiroshima to Kyoto in 2.5 hours. Alternatively, you can drive; or do a combination of bus and train. In September, daily temperatures in Kyoto can reach 33°C, while at night they dip to 23°C. Finish up your sightseeing early on the 7th (Tue) so you can go by car to Nara.

Things to do in Kyoto

Historic Sites · Neighborhoods · Shopping · Spas
Find places to stay Sep 4 — 7:

Nara

— 1 night

Ancient City

The country's first established capital, Nara houses some of the most storied buildings and natural attractions in Japan, with eight World Heritage Sites in total.
Kick off your visit on the 8th (Wed): contemplate in the serene atmosphere at Kofuku-ji Temple, appreciate the history behind Todai-ji Temple, then stroll around Nara Park, and finally contemplate in the serene atmosphere at Kasuga Grand Shrine.

To see more things to do, ratings, other places to visit, and other tourist information, read Nara trip maker tool.

Drive from Kyoto to Nara in an hour. Alternatively, you can take a train. In September, daytime highs in Nara are 33°C, while nighttime lows are 26°C. Finish your sightseeing early on the 8th (Wed) so you can take a train to Nagoya.

Things to do in Nara

Historic Sites · Parks · Wildlife
Find places to stay Sep 7 — 8:

Nagoya

— 1 night
Known nationally as an industrial heartland, Nagoya boasts a far more cosmopolitan and cultural core than its reputation would lead you to believe.
Start off your visit on the 9th (Thu): examine the collection at Toyota Commemorative Museum of Industry and Technology, then explore the historical opulence of Nagoya Castle, and then meet the residents at Port of Nagoya Public Aquarium.

Start your trip to Nagoya by creating a personalized itinerary on Inspirock.

Getting from Nara to Nagoya by train takes about 1.5 hours. Other options: drive; or take a bus. When traveling from Nara in September, plan for little chillier days and about the same nights in Nagoya: temperatures range from 29°C by day to 24°C at night. Cap off your sightseeing on the 9th (Thu) early enough to go by car to Ise.

Things to do in Nagoya

Parks · Zoos & Aquariums · Museums · Historic Sites
Find places to stay Sep 8 — 9:

Ise

— 2 nights
A spiritual center of Shintoism, Ise stands as a traditional city where visitors can see the roots of Japanese culture in a number of well-preserved natural and historic sites.
Kick off your visit on the 10th (Fri): admire nature's wide array of creatures at Toba Aquarium, find something for the whole family at Hotel Shima Spain Mura, and then take in the spiritual surroundings of Izawanomiya. Here are some ideas for day two: don't miss a visit to Okage Yokocho, then contemplate in the serene atmosphere at Ise Grand Shrine, and then examine the collection at Okageza.

You can plan Ise trip in no time by asking Inspirock to help create your itinerary.

Traveling by car from Nagoya to Ise takes 2 hours. Alternatively, you can take a train. In September, daytime highs in Ise are 30°C, while nighttime lows are 28°C. Cap off your sightseeing on the 11th (Sat) early enough to catch the flight back home.

Things to do in Ise

Historic Sites · Theme Parks · Parks · Zoos & Aquariums

Side Trips

Find places to stay Sep 9 — 11:

Hiroshima Prefecture travel guide

4.3
Historic Sites · Specialty Museums · Islands
Hiroshima Prefecture is a prefecture of Japan located in the Chūgoku region on Honshu island. The capital is the city of Hiroshima. It has a population of around 2.8 million.HistoryThe area around Hiroshima was formerly divided into Bingo Province and Aki Province. This location has been a center of trade and culture since the beginning of Japan's recorded history. Hiroshima is a traditional center of the Chūgoku region and was the seat of the Mōri clan until the Battle of Sekigahara.Hiroshima is home to two UNESCO World Heritage sites: The Atomic Dome in Hiroshima, one of the few remnants of prewar Hiroshima following the atomic bombing in 1945;The Itsukushima Shrine in Miyajima, famed for filling with water and appearing to "float" during high tide.GeographyHiroshima prefecture lies in the middle of Chūgoku. Most of the prefecture consists of mountains leading towards Shimane Prefecture; and rivers produce rich plains near the coast.The province faces Shikoku across the Seto Inland Sea. Hiroshima Bay opens on the Inland Sea. The prefecture also includes many small islands.

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Kyoto Prefecture travel guide

4.3
Historic Sites · Sacred & Religious Sites · Landmarks
Kyoto Prefecture is a prefecture of Japan in the Kansai region of the island of Honshu. The capital is the city of Kyoto.HistoryUntil the Meiji Restoration, the area of Kyoto Prefecture was known as Yamashiro.For most of its history, the city of Kyoto was Japan's Imperial capital. The city's history can be traced back as far as the 6th century. In 544, the Aoi Matsuri was held in Kyoto to pray for good harvest and good weather.Kyoto did not start out as Japan's capital. A noteworthy earlier capital was Nara. In 741, Emperor Shōmu moved the capital briefly to Kuni-kyo, between the cities of Nara and Kyoto, in present-day Kyoto Prefecture. In 784, the capital was moved to Nagaokakyō, also in present-day Kyoto Prefecture. In 794, Emperor Kanmu moved the capital to Heian-kyo, and this was the beginning of the current-day city of Kyoto. Even today, almost all of the streets, houses, stores, temples and shrines in Kyoto exist where they were placed in this year.Although in 1192 real political power shifted to Kamakura, where a samurai clan established the shogunate, Kyoto remained the imperial capital as the powerless emperors and their court continued to be seated in the city. Imperial rule was briefly restored in 1333, but another samurai clan established a new shogunate in Kyoto three years later.

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Nara Prefecture travel guide

4.3
Sacred & Religious Sites · Parks · Monuments
Nara Prefecture is a prefecture in the Kansai region of Japan. The capital is the city of Nara. Nara Prefecture has the distinction of having more UNESCO World Heritage Listings than any other prefecture.HistoryNara Prefecture region is considered one of the oldest regions in Japan spanning thousands of years. The present-day Nara Prefecture as it exists now officially was created in 1887, making it independent of Osaka Prefecture.Historically, Nara Prefecture was also known as Yamato-no-kuni or Yamato Province.Up to Nara PeriodIt is certain that there was a political force established at the foot of Mount Miwa in the east of Nara Basin, seeking unification of most parts in Japan from the third century until the fourth century, though the process was not well documented. At the dawn of history, Yamato was clearly the political center of Japan.Ancient capitals of Japan were built on the land of Nara, namely Asuka-kyō, Fujiwara-kyō (694–710) and Heijō-kyō (most of 710–784). The capital cities of Fujiwara and Heijō are believed to have been modeled after Chinese capitals at the time, incorporating grid layout patterns. The royal court also established relations with Sui and then Tang Dynasty China and sent students to the Middle Kingdom to learn high civilization. By 7th century, Nara accepted the many immigrants including refugees of Baekje who had escaped from war disturbances of the southern part of the Korean peninsula. The first high civilization with royal patronage of Buddhism flourished in today's Nara city (710–784 AD).

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Aichi Prefecture travel guide

4
Sacred & Religious Sites · Castles · Specialty Museums
Aichi Prefecture is a prefecture of Japan located in the Chūbu region. The region of Aichi is also known as the Tōkai region. The capital is Nagoya. It is the focus of the Chūkyō Metropolitan Area.HistoryOriginally, the region was divided into the two provinces of Owari and Mikawa. After the Meiji Restoration, Owari and Mikawa were united into a single entity. In 1871, after the abolition of the han system, Owari, with the exception of the Chita Peninsula, was established as Nagoya Prefecture, while Mikawa combined with the Chita Peninsula and formed Nukata Prefecture. Nagoya Prefecture was renamed to Aichi Prefecture in April 1872, and was united with Nukata Prefecture on November 27 of the same year.The government of Aichi Prefecture is located in the Aichi Prefectural Government Office in Nagoya, which is the old capital of Owari.The Expo 2005 World Exposition was held in Seto and Nagakute.EtymologyIn the third volume of the Man'yōshū there is a poem by Takechi Kurohito that reads: "The cry of the crane, calling to Sakurada; it sounds like the tide, draining from Ayuchi flats, hearing the crane cry". Ayuchi is the original form of the name Aichi, and the Fujimae tidal flat is all that remains of the earlier Ayuchi-gata. It is now a protected area.

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Mie Prefecture travel guide

4.1
Sacred & Religious Sites · Landmarks · Historic Sites
Mie Prefecture is a prefecture of Japan, which is part of the Kansai region on the main Honshu island. The capital is the city of Tsu.HistoryUntil the Meiji Restoration, the area that is now Mie Prefecture was made up of Ise Province, Shima Province, Iga Province and part of Kii Province.Evidence of human habitation in Mie dates back more than 10,000 years. During the Jōmon and Yayoi periods, agricultural communities began to form along the river and coastal areas of the region. Ise Shrine is said to have been established during the Yayoi period, and in the 7th century the Saikū Imperial Residence was built in what is now Meiwa Town to serve as both a residence and administrative centre for the Saiō, an Imperial Princess who served as High Priestess of Ise Shrine.During the Edo period, the area now known as Mie Prefecture consisted of several feudal domains, each ruled by an appointed lord. Transport networks, including the Tokaido and Ise Roads, were built. Port towns such as Ohminato, Kuwana and Anōtsu, posting stations and castle towns flourished. Pilgrimages to Ise Shrine also became very popular.

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